Instructional Program Assessments Summary

Program/Department PSLO/PSAO Course(s) assessed What did you learn from your outcomes assessment? Briefly describe the changes you will make based on your assessment. College-wide implications of your assessment project Assessment Reported
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Athletics) Citizenship SPORT 300, SPORT 312, SPORT 317, SPORT 351, SPORT 352, SPORT 365, SPORT 406

By participating on an athletic team, a student-athlete must be organized and on time, be in communication with their professors, complete grade checks and SEP's on a regular basis.  Some athletes participated in community clinics and fundraising events for needy organizations.

05/08/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Athletics) Competitive skills SPORT 300, SPORT 312, SPORT 317, SPORT 351, SPORT 352, SPORT 365, SPORT 406

Five of the nine athletic teams participated in post-season play. 

05/08/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Athletics) Relational skills SPORT 300, SPORT 312, SPORT 317, SPORT 351, SPORT 352, SPORT 365, SPORT 406

100% of the student-athletes stated that they think they are a better teammate and a more coachable athlete than when they arrived.

05/08/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Athletics) Critical thinking SPORT 300, SPORT 312, SPORT 317, SPORT 351, SPORT 352, SPORT 365, SPORT 406

96% of the student-athletes feel that they are prepared athletically to compete at the next level. 

05/08/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Athletics) Transfer SPORT 300, SPORT 312, SPORT 317, SPORT 351, SPORT 352, SPORT 365, SPORT 406

92% of the athletes stated that they are better prepared academically to successfully transfer to a 4-year university.

Have students list their top 5 schools as early as possible to make sure that the entrance requirements are met.

05/08/2017 view
Engineering Engineering--Communication ENGR 312, ENGR 412

P-SLO 6: Communication was assessed by observing students in ENGR 312: Graphics and ENGR 412: Properties of Materials. In ENGR 312, students end the course with a final design project. For this project, they design multiple three-dimensional objects that they assemble together in Solidworks, culminating in a final report and a final presentation to the class. The report that students submit has a writeup component describing their problem being solved and the method by which they solved it, in addition to drawings and renderings showing their final design. The final presentation is an opportunity for the student to show their final project to the class. In ENGR 412, students are more advanced in their engineering education by this point and give approximately 10 minute current event presentations in front of the class on a new/current materials science related issue and pose questions and critiques if appropriate. I have learned from the ENGR 312 course that since there are no pre-requisities for the course, for a lot of the students it's the first time they are really communicating with their professor and with other students. This is nerve-racking and difficult, and therefore giving them multiple avenues to communicate (report, short presentation, 1-on-1 discussion) seems to work best since individual students typically respond to at least one of those methods whereas they might not respond to the others. For ENGR 412, students have really embraced the current events as it shows immediate relevance of the course material to the real world. Students generally communicate well and are responsive to constructive criticism on their presentations because I make it clear how communication is the #1 skill that an engineer must possess in a job setting. 

Based on my assessment, I do not see any changes that are needed. 

05/06/2017 view
Engineering Engineering--Professionalism and Ethics ENGR 412

P-SLO 5: Professionalism and Ethics was assessed mainly via in-class design and group work assigned to students in ENGR 412: Properties of Materials. Examples of such assignments were analysis of the new Bay Bridge and material failures that occurred and analysis of the space shuttle Challenger disaster. In both examples, I tested students ability to work together in groups with other engineering students, and to respond to me as their engineering manager in a professional manner. We also discussed the ethical implications of engineering decisions that they made with the worst result of an unethical decision being death of people. I learned that more than anything, the students appreciated these exercises and became further motivated in their studies as they felt the importance of their field and of their decisions. 

The basis for these group/design studies is working, but could be aided by bringing in more practicing engineers to interface with the students. Students could be broken up into groups of 3-5 and placed with an engineer from industry who would volunteer their time for half an hour or so. That engineer could then pose real-life problems to the students and walk them through what a real engineering meeting is like, the decisions that have to be made in a professional context, and the ethical and safety framework that envelops these decisions. 

05/06/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science ECE 320, ECE 321

The CDC will strive to stay fully enrolled in efforts to stay fiscally responsible.  Marketing to the greater CRC community, announcements to current parents, and sending flyers to local elementary schools for our school age program all contribute to our enrollments.   Added a winter intersession for children in January 2017,  but enrollments were insufficient for financial gain. 

In order to increase enrollments, a summer session for children is added for the first time in Summer 2017.

05/04/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science ECE 320, ECE 321

Infrastructure and fiscal responsibility continues to be maintained by keeping the Center as fully enrolled as possible with children, as well as by prudent spending.

Stakeholders in the CDC include parents, staff, and ECE faculty.  Regular parent meetings are held to ascertain the needs of the families in consideration for areas of growth.  Regular meetings are also held with ECE faculty particularly in regard to the role of the CDC as a Practicum site for students.

Existing resources are always a consideration, and grants have been awarded and are continuing to be pursued in support of the needs of the Center.

Currently a grant for a new playground is being pursued.  The old playground has become a safety hazard and can no longer be used by the children.  Other resources will need to be identified to replace it if the grant is not awarded.

05/04/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science ECE 320, ECE 321

Staff in the CDC must complete 105 hours of professional development every two years to maintain their permit.  Staff to child ratios must also be maintained in the CDC to meet regulations.  Supervisor must balance time off for PD and training with the needs of the Center.

New staff are currently being hired for the CDC as some retire.  Additional substitute teachers and part-time staff may be needed to maintain appropriate ratios.

05/04/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science ECE 420, ECE 422

All teachers in the CDC are responsible for maintaining compliance with Title 22 and Title 5 Compliance.  We have not had any negative audit findings in annual external audits for Title 22.  We are scheduled to have a Title 5 audit next year.

Teachers need time outside of the classroom to comply with Title 5 regulations and complete the Desired Results Developmental Profiles (DRDP) assessment.  Support with substitute teachers is necessary to maintain ratio of teachers to children in the classroom while permanent staff complete the assessments.

05/04/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science Child Development Center--Access ECE 320, ECE 321

CDC teachers directly observe children in the Center and assess their development.  Children's activities and environments are developed in direct response to observations, in order to provide high quality and appropriate educational opportunities based on the children's developmental needs and interests.

No changes are planned at this time, although parents request the opportunity to bring younger children to the Center and longer hours of operation.

05/04/2017 view
Early Childhood Education/Family and Consumer Science Child Development Center--Practicum ECE 320, ECE 321

The Child Development Center has continued to provide Practicum opportunities for students involved in the ECE program and will continue to work closely with ECE faculty in the future.

Teacher support in CDC would benefit from professional development to keep up to date in current best practices.

05/04/2017 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--Environment HCIT 100, HCIT 140, HCIT 162, HCIT 164

Overall students are meeting this program student learning outcome.  

 

Based on industry feedback students might need to know more than the skill sets for "typical computing environment" in the future.  Industry is also pushing us to be more relevant.  We hope some professional development, changes in curriculum and additional new equipment and supplies will meet their needs.

 

05/03/2017 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--Information Technology HCIT 132, HCIT 142, HCIT 144

Overall students are meeting this program student learning outcome.  

The college needs to update the software it uses for its labs. It needs to be more relevant with what is used in the workplace.

05/03/2017 view
Physics/Astronomy Physics/Astronomy--Successfully complete and transfer to a four-year university ASTR 300, ASTR 400, PHYS 310, PHYS 350, PHYS 360, PHYS 370, PHYS 380, PHYS 411, PHYS 421, PHYS 431

PSLO 1 includes "Successfully complete and transfer all core and general education requirements in physics or astronomy to a four-year university to satisfy lower-division program requirements."  Using ASSIST, we checked articulation agreements in physics and astronomy with several nearby CSU's and UC's.  The results follow:

CSUS:  All CRC astronomy and physics courses directly articulate with courses at CSUS.

UCD:  All CRC physics sequences directly articulate with sequences at UCD.  CRC's PHYS 310 course directly articulates with UCD's PHYS 10.  CRC's astronomy courses do not articulate at UCD, although they still transfer for GE credit.  UCD has chosen to split the introductory astronomy material into two courses - one that covers the solar system, and another that covers stars, galaxies and the universe.

UCB:  CRC's ASTR 300 and 400 together articulate with ASTR 10 at UCB.  All physics sequences articulate with UCB's sequences.  PHYS 310, though acceptable for IGETC, does not directly articulate with a course at UCB.

CSU Chico:  All CRC Physics sequences directly articulate with CSU Chico's sequences.  ASTR 300 and 400 together articulate with GEOS 105 at Chico.

SFSU:  All CRC physics courses except PHYS 310 have course-to-course articulation at SFSU.  ASTR 300 and 400, though acceptable for CSUGE, do not directly articulate.

CSUEB:  All CRC physics sequences directly articulate with sequences at CSU East Bay.  CRC's ASTR courses articulate directly with astronomy courses at CSUEB.

CSU Sonoma:  There is no course articulation between CRC and Sonoma State University in astronomy or physics.

Overall, CRC's astronomy and physics courses thoroughly articulate with nearby CSU's and UC's.  We must research whether the lack of articulation with Sonoma State University is just an oversight (lack of requests) or due to a significant difference in curricular requirements.

04/26/2017 view
Geography Geography--Geographic Tools and Techniques GEOG 353

Assessment was also conducted in Geog 335.

We are working on modifying our GIS certificate requirements. this should allow students to complete the certificate in a more expidited manner. The material previously covered in the GPS class will be added to the GIS class when reviewing data collection methods. I beleive that the same material will be able to be covered.

We have also changed our class format for Geog 335 to being one 3-unit class, rather than the previous 3 individual classes. Scheduling (number of hours with students each week) have thus changed slightly too and has taken some need to adjust the lecture and lab scheduling.

It is simply a process of sdjusting the schedule to accomodate the new times that are provided.  The final term project will probably be simplified, however this semester a significant midterm assignment was assigned which helped teach many of the same principles.

03/22/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Kinesiology) Comprehend, demonstrate and articulate the complexities of Kinesiology FITNS 352, KINES 300, PACT 310, TMACT 330

90% of students in our AAT degree, found that the activity electives offered are too restrictive. Some are not appropirate for their academic or career goals. 

30% of students couldn't register in Kines 300 due to lack of availablity. 

We will change this SLO. We will make changes in the degree requirement so the offerings are not so limited. We will offer Kines 300 each semester and offer it online.  We need to acquire more class room space for our enhanced degree program.

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Kinesiology) Understand motivational techniques ADAPT 300, ADAPT 332, ADAPT 336, FITNS 301, FITNS 306, FITNS 320, FITNS 323, FITNS 331, FITNS 352, FITNS 355, FITNS 380, FITNS 381, FITNS 390, FITNS 406, FITNS 440, FITNS 441, FITNS 442, FITNS 444, KINES 300, KINES 301, PACT 310, PACT 390, TMACT 300, TMACT 301, TMACT 302, TMACT 303, TMACT 320, TMACT 321, TMACT 330, TMACT 331, TMACT 333

90% of all students created smart goals related to fitness which can be re-assessed through out the course and continued use of fitness endeavors.

80% of all students were able to compare and contrast pre and post assessment scores related to body composition, body measurements and cardiac output.

We need to purchase heart rate monitor group system. This is new technology related to our discipline.

We need to purchase body compostiion analysis machine, scales and other instruments and supplies to enhance this teaching and learning environment for our students, as the need arises. 

Improve maintence checks of facilites to ensure a safe and healthy learning environment for all of our students.

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Health) Health Management HEED 300, HEED 350, KINES 301

We have gathered information as feedback from students that have helped us assess that we are teaching them how to avoid behaviors that are detrimental to their health, fitness, and overall wellness.  For example they are now much more aware of the amount of sugar in their food and what high levels of sugar does to the human body and the impact it has on our societies health care costs. 

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Kinesiology) Understand biomechanical movement ADAPT 300, ADAPT 332, ADAPT 336, FITNS 301, FITNS 306, FITNS 320, FITNS 323, FITNS 331, FITNS 352, FITNS 355, FITNS 380, FITNS 381, FITNS 390, FITNS 406, FITNS 440, FITNS 441, FITNS 442, FITNS 444, KINES 300, KINES 301, PACT 310, PACT 390, TMACT 300, TMACT 301, TMACT 302, TMACT 303, TMACT 320, TMACT 321, TMACT 330, TMACT 331, TMACT 333

95% of all students were able to demonstrate and apply proper mechanics, techniques and efficiency in instructed movement(s).

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Kinesiology) Utilize knowledge for a personalized fitness program ADAPT 300, ADAPT 336, FITNS 306, FITNS 320, FITNS 331, FITNS 352, FITNS 390, FITNS 406, FITNS 444, PACT 310, TMACT 301, TMACT 303, TMACT 320

90% of all students were able to design a workout followed by implementing resistive work and flexibility exercises. 

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Health) Motivational Techniques HEED 300, HEED 350, KINES 301

The most powerful form of motivation we found was through video's and guest speakers. We found that the students were able to take away real life examples from the videos and guest speakers that would make a larger impact on their lives than just reading out of the textbook or listening to lectures. 

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Kinesiology) Validity of fitness and health information ADAPT 300, ADAPT 336, FITNS 301, FITNS 306, FITNS 331, FITNS 352, FITNS 380, FITNS 381, FITNS 444, TMACT 320, TMACT 321

70% of all students were able to demonstrate an understanding of achieving their target heart rate zone and increase their intensity to proper fitness levels while exercising.

We would like to purchase heart rate monitors, body composition analysis machines, scales, and any other new technologies related to fitness and health. Group heart rate system to individualize fitness levels appropriate for each student. This technology will help establish better assesment of student's fitness levels. 

Increase maintenence checks and frequency of monitoring of equipment and supplies to ensure student access to clean and safe equpment and facilities.

02/24/2017 view
Kinesiology and Athletics Kinesiology and Athletics--(Health) Self-directed learning skills HEED 300, HEED 350, KINES 301

We learned that through our instruction and observations students have learned new techniques on how to prevent disease through healthy lifestyle choices, and how to continue to assess their health levels throughout their lifetime and make any changes needed to continue to create a healthy lifestyle. 

02/24/2017 view

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