Instructional Program Assessments Summary

Program/Department PSLO/PSAO Course(s) assessed What did you learn from your outcomes assessment? Briefly describe the changes you will make based on your assessment. College-wide implications of your assessment project Assessment Reported
Computer Info Science: Database & Programming Computer Info Science: Database & Programming--Critical Thinking Skills: CISP 300, CISP 310, CISP 360

CISP students have been able to use basic concepts such as variables, loops, ifs, modules, and functions to build complex programming logic in CISP 300, 360, and 310.

They have been able to handle ambiguous situations, such as problem statements that are non-specific, by applying programming patterns and best practices to create programs that follow the rules of the programming language.

I observed this by providing ambiguous situations and modeling techniques to overcome these situations.

I'll continue to ask students to apply basic programming concepts as building blocks towards complicated programs. I'll assess their ability to do so, and attempt to uncover the limits of this approach.

11/23/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Personal Responsibility and Professionalism ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

We strive to have a program that develops understanding, responsibility and ability to apply professional skills of the workplace.  This includes: attendance, promptness, integrity, tolerance, respect for the views of others, and contributions to our communities as a socially aware citizens.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Community Partnership ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

Among the faculty who teach in the program, we work hard to develop strong connections to the workplace and professional organizations such as American Institute of Architects (AIA), Construction Specification Institute (CSI), Building Industry Association (BIA), etc. These connections can help our students with relevant coursework and projects, internships, and potential sources for employment.

We will continue to involve ourselves in relevant community partnerships to benefit our program and our students.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Student Success ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

It is a major focus of our program to manage and create support systems that encourage retention and successful matriculation through the architecture design technology program.

We are always looking for improved ways to support our students so that they can succeed in our program.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Transfer ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

It is a primary goal of ours that we prepare the students who are interested to meet the requirements of the CRC transfer schools and enhance student ability to matriculate successfully through their programs.

Although we are always adjusting and adapating what we're doing, this is a core focus of our program for students who wish to transfer.  Many of our students do not.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Life Long Learning ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

We hope that our students develop a professional attitude and desire for life-long learning and we promote this on all levels in all courses, but it is difficult to measure.

As we move forward in our program and make requisite changes, potential outcomes such as this one may become embedded in other, more concrete outcomes since this is difficult to measure.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Professional Ethics ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

We want students to develop the values of professional ethics as it relates to professional practice in the fields of architecture, engineering, construction and related industries.  This includes an understanding of appropriate business practices, digital integrity and piracy, cultural diversity in the workplace, etc. We hope we are instilling this throughout our courses, conversations, speakers, and other activities, but it is not easy to measure. 

As we move forward in our program and make requisite changes, potential outcomes such as this one may become embedded in other, more concrete outcomes since this is difficult to measure.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Collaborative Skills ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

When our students complete our program, we would like them to be able to work in an office environment utilizing interpersonal skills.  This includes the skills and abilities to be a successful team member and work in a self directed way to accomplish project related tasks. While this is the ideal, we are still developing ways to encourage this and promote this. Partly because much of the work is done on computers (one station per group), and partly because students are focused on their own skill development, it is difficult to get them to work in groups. 

We are emphasizing this in many ways, including getting them to work with students from other programs, including architecture and building, so that they might better understand the importance of working in groups.  We are also working on the development of a central server location, which would bring them together a bit more. This is something we can always do better since it is a necessary part of the professional world.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Communication ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

It is our goal that when they complete our program, our students will have the the necessary digital communication skills to convey ideas, designs, construction plans and engineering concepts as it relates to the workplace.  Digital communication includes writing, digital documentation, computer modeling, digital fabrication and presentation, and public speaking. We do a good job in most of these areas, although we are working toward a greater emphasis on digital fabrication, including staying abreast of industry, software, and other technical developments.

We are always looking for new ways to present concepts and skills in this ever-changing technical environment.

11/22/2016 view
Architectural Design Tech Architectural Design Tech--Critical Thinking and Problem Solving ADT 300, ADT 302, ADT 304, ADT 310, ADT 314, ADT 317, ADT 319

We stress the development and application of critical thinking skill and problem solving skills in all of our courses. Since we have a lab environment in our courses, we are able to demonstrate how to apply these skills using digital tools.

11/22/2016 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--Health Care Information Technology HCIT 132, HCIT 142, HCIT 144

To fulfill PSLO 3, students need be able to design electronic health records (EHRs) to facilitate the workflow in a small physician's office. Although the students learn the skills needed to accomplish these tasks, additional time is needed by students in HCIT classes to test their designs so that the views in the EHR software work properly.

The current EHR software (the Veterans' Affairs Vista) is dated as a result of some of the recent changes that have occurred as a part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2009. One of these changes is that the billing codes have changed from International Classification of Disease codes (9th edition to 10th edition) standards. This change affects how medicines are ordered by nurses and doctors in the EHR software.

The current EHR software lacks the security features that have been implemented as a part of the ACA.

It is recommended that the HCIT program adopt EHR software that supports the recent changes which have occurred as a result of the Afforadable Care Act. As the ACA changes, changes will be required of the HCIT curriculum in order for the college to stay current as a trainer of those who will work in the health care field.

Health care security is an area which needs further improvement because it is a weakness which has been recognized by health care employers. Adding a class to the HCIT program which specializes in health care security would help students become more conscious of the need for maintaining secure patient records and more aware of the steps they can take to provide patients with that kind of security.

11/21/2016 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--Environment HCIT 100, HCIT 142, HCIT 162

Students are learning to assess learning environments to enhance their skills in configuring and making changes to Electronic Health Records (EHR) software, which affects the training needs of others. Specifically, students are assessing and changing their teaching methods as they train doctors, nurses, medical assistants to use the software.

Meeting with employers in the area will help us determine how to revise/update curriculum.

Having faculty attend industry-based events will provide the necessary insight for professional development.

11/20/2016 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--Soft Skill HCIT 100, HCIT 102, HCIT 160, HCIT 162, HCIT 164

All four faculty members involved have commented that course material developed for each class is extensive and well developed. That being said, to stay current course material periodically needs to be updated.  During the upcoming year, the material in each course needs to be reviewed and updated.

 

A major consideration is the ongoing national debate on health care, including the Affordable Care Act  (ACA) of 2009.  As the ACA changes, changes will be required of the HCIT curriculum in order for the college to stay current as a trainer of those who will work in the health care field.

Meeting with employers in the area will help us determine how to revise/update curriculum.

11/20/2016 view
Computer Info Science: Database & Programming Computer Info Science: Database & Programming--Information Competency: CISP 350, CISP 351, CISP 354

Students are able to understand and discern various information sources as needed.  Student responses to various discussion topics showed effective synthethis, analysis of information.

While students are able to grasp information from a primary source, students do however struggle with reconciling information from multiple sources.  Students also seem to struggle with assessing the most relevant information to extract from a given source.  More hands on projects and more opportunities to allow students to present and defend their analysis seemed to be an effective way to get students to think more analytically along these lines.

Include more project based learning activities.

Include projects with required paper presentation or final project presentation components.

Provide more avenues to allow students to present their findings, via discussion questions, so they can demontsrate synthesis of information across multiple sources.

11/17/2016 view
Computer Info Science: Database & Programming Computer Info Science: Database & Programming--Ethics CISP 350, CISP 351, CISP 352, CISP 353

Work that students submitted as part of the graded components of the course was the students' own effort. Students submitted code that they developed and provided responses to discussion questions which showed synthesis of material.

Where appropriate, students included citations to work not their own.  Verification of student submitted responses against online sources did not reveal any indication of plagiarism.  When in doubt, students were open to seek clarification and request feedback on their questions.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--JOUR: Media History and Traditions JOUR 310, JOUR 320

It is important to our program that students learn to Identify and explain the processes, elements, history, theory, and effects of modern mass media in society. We facilitate discussions, lectures, exercises, viewings, and writing assignments in order for students to reach this level of competence.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Evaluation FMS 310, FMS 489

In order to fully grasp the field of Film and Media Studies, students need to be able to evaluate research on and popular claims of the media's social, political, and individual effects. There are ample opportunities to do this in these courses and we provide lectures, discussions, activities, films, essay assignments, and examinations to ensure that students understand.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Film Practices and Traditions FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

We focus on preparing our students to demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film. They do this through discussions, lectures, hands-on activities, viewing of a variety of films, and essay assignments.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Norms FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

In all of our courses we explain the processes, current structure, and ethical norms of American media to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of the field.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Video Production FMS 300

No longer done in courses.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: History and Contributions FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 320, FMS 489

Because we want our students to be able to articulate the history, development, genre, and movements of the film medium and recognize the contributions of national, minority, diasporic, and subaltern filmmakers, we spend a great deal of time in our courses providing opportunities for our students to do this. We do this through discussions, viewing of a wide range of films, written and verbal responses, and other analytical exercises.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Analysis FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

In order for students to truly engage in the field of Film and Media Studies, they need to be able to recognize, articulate, and judge the visual, verbal, and audio conventions through which images, words, and sounds make meaning in film and media texts. We emphasize this in all of our courses and give them ample opportunities through exercises, discussions, film viewing and writing assignments.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--JOUR: Evaluation JOUR 300, JOUR 310, JOUR 320, JOUR 330, JOUR 335, JOUR 410

It is essential in the field of journalism that students learn to evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy, fairness, appropriate style, and grammatical correctness. We emphasize this in all of these journalism courses.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Critical Thinking FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

Students in these classes learn to analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures. This is a primary emphasis of these courses.

11/17/2016 view
Construction Management Tech Construction Management Tech--General Oversight CMT 134, CMT 136, CMT 300, CMT 310, CMT 313

Providing our students with what they need to understand the larger picture of all that is involved in this industry is essential. We are always seeking ways to do this. 

By the time they are 3rd year students in our program, they usually have a clear view of this, but it is also useful for them to understand after the first semester whether they are on the right path or not. It is helpful to them and the overall program to be sure they understand this.

11/17/2016 view

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