Instructional Program Assessments Summary

Program/Department PSLO/PSAO Course(s) assessed What did you learn from your outcomes assessment? Briefly describe the changes you will make based on your assessment. College-wide implications of your assessment project Assessment Reported
Health Care Information Technology HCIT 100, HCIT 142, HCIT 162

Students are learning to assess learning environments to enhance their skills in configuring and making changes to Electronic Health Records (EHR) software, which affects the training needs of others. Specifically, students are assessing and changing their teaching methods as they train doctors, nurses, medical assistants to use the software.

Meeting with employers in the area will help us determine how to revise/update curriculum.

Having faculty attend industry-based events will provide the necessary insight for professional development.

11/20/2016 view
Health Care Information Technology Health Care Information Technology--HRIT Soft Skills HCIT 100, HCIT 102, HCIT 160, HCIT 162, HCIT 164

All four faculty members involved have commented that course material developed for each class is extensive and well developed. That being said, to stay current course material periodically needs to be updated.  During the upcoming year, the material in each course needs to be reviewed and updated.

 

A major consideration is the ongoing national debate on health care, including the Affordable Care Act  (ACA) of 2009.  As the ACA changes, changes will be required of the HCIT curriculum in order for the college to stay current as a trainer of those who will work in the health care field.

Meeting with employers in the area will help us determine how to revise/update curriculum.

11/20/2016 view
Computer Info Science: Database & Programming Computer Info Science: Database & Programming--Information Competency: CISP 350, CISP 351, CISP 354

Students are able to understand and discern various information sources as needed.  Student responses to various discussion topics showed effective synthethis, analysis of information.

While students are able to grasp information from a primary source, students do however struggle with reconciling information from multiple sources.  Students also seem to struggle with assessing the most relevant information to extract from a given source.  More hands on projects and more opportunities to allow students to present and defend their analysis seemed to be an effective way to get students to think more analytically along these lines.

Include more project based learning activities.

Include projects with required paper presentation or final project presentation components.

Provide more avenues to allow students to present their findings, via discussion questions, so they can demontsrate synthesis of information across multiple sources.

11/17/2016 view
Computer Info Science: Database & Programming Computer Info Science: Database & Programming--Ethics CISP 350, CISP 351, CISP 352, CISP 353

Work that students submitted as part of the graded components of the course was the students' own effort. Students submitted code that they developed and provided responses to discussion questions which showed synthesis of material.

Where appropriate, students included citations to work not their own.  Verification of student submitted responses against online sources did not reveal any indication of plagiarism.  When in doubt, students were open to seek clarification and request feedback on their questions.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--JOUR: Media History and Traditions JOUR 310, JOUR 320

It is important to our program that students learn to Identify and explain the processes, elements, history, theory, and effects of modern mass media in society. We facilitate discussions, lectures, exercises, viewings, and writing assignments in order for students to reach this level of competence.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Evaluation FMS 310, FMS 489

In order to fully grasp the field of Film and Media Studies, students need to be able to evaluate research on and popular claims of the media's social, political, and individual effects. There are ample opportunities to do this in these courses and we provide lectures, discussions, activities, films, essay assignments, and examinations to ensure that students understand.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Film Practices and Traditions FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

We focus on preparing our students to demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film. They do this through discussions, lectures, hands-on activities, viewing of a variety of films, and essay assignments.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Norms FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

In all of our courses we explain the processes, current structure, and ethical norms of American media to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of the field.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Video Production FMS 300

No longer done in courses.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: History and Contributions FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 320, FMS 489

Because we want our students to be able to articulate the history, development, genre, and movements of the film medium and recognize the contributions of national, minority, diasporic, and subaltern filmmakers, we spend a great deal of time in our courses providing opportunities for our students to do this. We do this through discussions, viewing of a wide range of films, written and verbal responses, and other analytical exercises.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Analysis FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

In order for students to truly engage in the field of Film and Media Studies, they need to be able to recognize, articulate, and judge the visual, verbal, and audio conventions through which images, words, and sounds make meaning in film and media texts. We emphasize this in all of our courses and give them ample opportunities through exercises, discussions, film viewing and writing assignments.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--JOUR: Evaluation JOUR 300, JOUR 310, JOUR 320, JOUR 330, JOUR 335, JOUR 410

It is essential in the field of journalism that students learn to evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy, fairness, appropriate style, and grammatical correctness. We emphasize this in all of these journalism courses.

11/17/2016 view
Journalism/Film and Media Studies Journalism/Film and Media Studies--FMS: Critical Thinking FMS 300, FMS 305, FMS 310, FMS 320, FMS 489

Students in these classes learn to analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures. This is a primary emphasis of these courses.

11/17/2016 view
Construction Management Technology Construction Management Technology--General Oversight CMT 134, CMT 136, CMT 300, CMT 310, CMT 313

Providing our students with what they need to understand the larger picture of all that is involved in this industry is essential. We are always seeking ways to do this. 

By the time they are 3rd year students in our program, they usually have a clear view of this, but it is also useful for them to understand after the first semester whether they are on the right path or not. It is helpful to them and the overall program to be sure they understand this.

11/17/2016 view
Construction Management Technology Construction Management Technology--Professional Practice CMT 120, CMT 136

It is essential that our students are exposed to all aspects of professional practice in this industry. There are so many pieces to this industry that to be successful, construction managers need to understand each of them, as well as how they fit together. It is always our goal to continue to provide additional opportunities for our students to learn these. One way we do this is by providing them with opportunities to meet with industry professionals to give them more preparation.

We will continue to seek additional ways to provide our students with this information and necessary skills.

11/17/2016 view
English English--Diversity ENGCW 400, ENGCW 410, ENGCW 420, ENGCW 430, ENGED 305, ENGED 320, ENGLT 303, ENGLT 310, ENGLT 311, ENGLT 320, ENGLT 321, ENGLT 336, ENGLT 340, ENGLT 345, ENGLT 360, ENGLT 370, ENGRD 310, ENGRD 312, ENGWR 300, ENGWR 301, ENGWR 302, ENGWR 341, ENGWR 480

The English department incorporates readings and lesson plans in the program that reflect the diverse world in which students live. Students leave the department more aware of cultural, religious and lifestyle differences that exist in our society.

11/17/2016 view
English - Basic Skills [LEGACY] English - Basic Skills [LEGACY]--Diversity ENGLB 70, ENGLB 72, ENGLB 73, ENGLB 74, ENGLB 75, ENGLB 76, ENGRD 110, ENGRD 200, ENGRD 59, ENGWR 101, ENGWR 42, ENGWR 58, ENGWR 99

The English department incorporates readings and lesson plans in the program that reflect the diverse world in which students live. Students leave the department more aware of cultural, religious and lifestyle differences that exist in our society.

11/17/2016 view
Pharmacy Technology Pharmacy Technology--Communication PHARM 300, PHARM 315, PHARM 320, PHARM 350, PHARM 360, PHARM 380, PHARM 400, PHARM 410, PHARM 420

Communications is an essential skill for Pharmacy Technicians whether they practice in a Retail Pharmacy or in the Hospital setting.  In our hands on laboratory training classes, students are given assignments to write summary reports and to present their findings to the class orally.  During the first year of the training, students are given an assignment to complete a Field Project which requires them to do an interview with a working Pharmacy Technician to gain insights of what typical duties are performed in the Pharmacy where he or she works, and share their information with the rest of the class before submitting the written report for credit.  During the second year training, students are assigned a Research Project on a newly FDA approved medication including information suitable as drug information for other health professionals and information in lay language suitable to provide to patients.  The Research Project is to be presented in class using PPT slide projection and a written report is necessary to be submitted for full credit.   Throughout the Pharmacy Technology training program, emphasis is placed on having good Customer Service which includes positive attitude, professional appearance, attentiveness, empathy to patients, and good communication skills.  Students are given opportunities to do role play exercises to enhance their understanding of the importance of good customer service.  With the implementation of various exercises focusing on communications both written and verbal, students can comprehend and appreciate that, having good communication skills is an important factor in the success of their future careers.

11/16/2016 view
Horticulture/Plant Science Horticulture/Plant Science--Skill Development HORT 105, HORT 300, HORT 302, HORT 303, HORT 305, HORT 306, HORT 320, HORT 340, HORT 341, HORT 350, HORT 351, PLTS 310, PLTS 332

The program courses that were evaluated for this PSLO assessment have shown to be very effective in providing the basic and some advanced horticultural skills expected of those working in the horticulture industry, as well as those students that choose to transfer to institutions of high education.  No major skill deficiencies have been identified.  Areas that can be strengthened have been found in the irrigation courses with respect to hydraulics and irrigation design.

To strengthen skill acquisition in some of the horticulture courses, additional coursework shall be developed, and small changes in laboratory scheduling will allow for increased hand-on time for students to improve their skills.  No major changes to curriculum will be needed at his time.

11/16/2016 view
Horticulture/Plant Science Horticulture/Plant Science--Transfer HORT 300, HORT 302, HORT 305, HORT 306, HORT 340, HORT 341, PLTS 310

Horticulture 300, 302, 305, 306, and Plant Science 310 have been accepted at most CSU and UC institutions for transfer.  The courses are performing as expected in providing and assessing the technical knowledge and skills expected by transfer institutions.  CRC Horticulture students that have transferred to the CSU or UC system have indicated that the Horticulture courses that transferred had successfully prepared them for their higher institution work.

Most of the students that take Horticulture courses have indicated that they do not intend to transfer; therefore, data is minimal beyond the few students we have tracked.

More work and collaboration needs to be done in the areas of landscape design and architecture to identify areas that can be improved to ensure a greater degree of articulation with CSU and UC Landscape Architecture programs, or, a minimum, allow CRC students to be more competitive when applying to these programs.

Staff will contact CSU and UC Horticulture programs to establish stronger relationships with the CRC Horticulture Program and to identify courses that need to be revised and/or strengthened so that these courses can be transferred and/or articulated.

11/16/2016 view
Horticulture/Plant Science Horticulture/Plant Science--Technical Expertise HORT 105, HORT 300, HORT 302, HORT 306, HORT 340, HORT 350, HORT 351, PLTS 310

After review of the coursework and assessments of the courses used for this program SLO assessment, it has been determined that students are proficient with respect to technical expertise in most areas.  The courses in which students find the greatest degree of difficulty are the irrigation courses; Hort 350 and 351.  Changes in curriculum delivery, coursework, and assessment are needed to strengthen the technical expertise of our students in the area of hydraulics and irrigation design.

Beginning in spring 2017 with Hort 350, I will introduce irrigation hydraulics in a modular fashion and add addition hands-on opportunities, coursework, and assessments to strengthen proficiency in this area.  This will require a change in the course outline, scheduling, and content delivery.  These changes will also take place in fall 2017 in the Hort 351 course.

After the completion of these courses, I will need to examine student performance data and reassess if further action will need to be taken to ensure that students are achieving the great degree of technical expertise in these areas.

Minor changes will need to be made in other courses as necessary; however, no major problems have been identified.

11/16/2016 view
Horticulture/Plant Science Horticulture/Plant Science--Licensing and Certification Preparation HORT 105, HORT 300, HORT 305, HORT 306, HORT 320, HORT 350, HORT 351

The courses that directly relate to the preparation of students to be successful on industry and state certification exams are exceeding expectations.  100% of course / program completers that have attempted a certification exam have successfully passed, and have earned one or more industry and/or state certifications; including: Contractor's State License Board C-27 license, California Department of Pesticide Regulation QAC / QAL certification, Landscape Technician Certification, and Assocoiation of Professional Landscape Designers certification.

No changes are currently needed; however, regular review of the industry and discussions with industry partners and our Advisory Committee will identify changes and areas of revision needed to our courses and programs as appropriate to ensure that our students are best prepared for success on certification exams.

11/16/2016 view
Pharmacy Technology Pharmacy Technology--Ethics PHARM 300, PHARM 315, PHARM 320, PHARM 350, PHARM 360, PHARM 380, PHARM 400, PHARM 410, PHARM 420

Ethic is the center piece of all values we teach in any program related to Health Care and Pharmacy Technicians are part of the Health Care Delivery Team.  During the entire duration of the Pharmacy Technology Program training, we emphasize zero tolerance to making errors because we subscribe to the principle of “Do No Harm”, and anything less than 100% of accuracy is just not acceptable in our profession.  We also place emphasis on efficiency and students are taught not to compromise accuracy in order to achieve efficiency in performing their duties.  In our hands on laboratory training classes, students are taught the value of teamwork and how teamwork can improve accuracy by group discussions and by implementation of the double checking system to help reduce errors being made.  Students are told “whatever you do, do it as if it is for your Grandmother.”  All students embrace with these values we teach and are expected to perform their duties as a professional if they wish to be respected as a professional.

11/16/2016 view
Horticulture/Plant Science Horticulture/Plant Science--Job Market Preparation HORT 300, HORT 302, HORT 306, HORT 340, HORT 350, HORT 351, PLTS 310

All courses are performing well in preparing students for employment in the local and regional Horticulture Industry.  Regualr monitoring of the horticulture industry and discussions with our industry partners and advisory committee will identify new data, information, and training requirments that will need to be added to appropriate courses in order to keep the program in-step with the industry.

No specific changes are needed at this time; however, as our industry changes, course curriculum, teaching methods, and assesments with be revised to ensure that our students recieve the latest information and experiences required for successful employment.

11/16/2016 view
Construction Management Technology Construction Management Technology--Management CMT 112, CMT 120, CMT 134, CMT 310

Given the many different legal constraints present in this field, in addition to the complex elements of each project, we do a good job teaching our students basic management skills. We can always add to this class and cover all of the additional elements that come into play with each unique, individual project.

One element we hope to utilize is connecting with teachers and professionals in project management areas to demonstrate to our students all that is required.  We would like to work with faculty in other areas as well as those who simply manage people in order to give students a broader picture of all of the elements necessary in managing so many aspects of each project.

11/16/2016 view

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